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4. Evidence Source

IMPACTS (POSITIVE)

No

Citation / Evidence

Detail of citation, evidence to support

Individual

Entertainment and enjoyment

88

NIEIR 2000, Economic Impact of Gambling

Most people gamble primarily for enjoyment and secondly to socialise. They also gamble to relieve boredom and to relax (p. 55 and 236)

89

VCGA 2001, Social and Economic Impacts of Gaming

Venues considered safe for vulnerable groups including older people, women and CALD backgrounds (p.68, 73).

90

Productivity Commission Report on Gambling (PC) 2010

Many people enjoy gambling and the associated activities in the venues where it takes place (S.6, Sub-section 6.1).

91

DOJ 2010 (Thomas), Problem Gambling Vulnerability

Social accessibility (S.1.1.3)

92

CIE 2009, Gambling with Policy

About 30% of Australian adults use gaming machines as a source of entertainment (p.2)

Interpersonal

Social enjoyment with family and friends

93

GRA 2010, A Review of Australian Gambling Research

Economic and geographical impact studies (Ch. 6)

94

DOJ 2010 (Thomas), Problem Gambling Vulnerability

Social enjoyment (S.2.2.3)

95

NIEIR 2000, Economic Impact of Gambling

People enjoy gambling as a social activity, source of relaxation and escape (p.222).

96

PC Report on Gambling 2010

EGM Clubs host more live entertainment than clubs without EGMs (but hotels with EGMs host less) (S. 6.3).

97

CIE 2009, Gambling with Policy

People visit EGM venues for social reasons, subsidised food and facilities etc. (p.5)

Organisational

Increased revenue for gaming venues

98

VCGLR Statistics relating to expenditure

Statistics relating to expenditure on, and location of, EGMs and venues in Victoria.

99

NIEIR 2000, Economic Impact of Gambling

EGM revenue forms a significant part of the Australian economy (p. 222).

100

VCGA 2001, Social and Economic Impacts of Gaming

Venues receive additional revenue and venue growth occurs (p.77).

101

PC Report on Gambling 2010

Hotels receive 25% of gross profits and clubs receive 33.33% (S.24).

102

CIE 2009, Gambling with Policy

Gambling revenue breakdown as percentage of total revenue for clubs and hotels (p.5).

Community

Provide venues for entertainment

103

VCGA 2001, Social and Economic Impacts of Gaming

Welcoming venues, ability to cater for community group meeting space (p.73-74)

104

PC Report on Gambling 2010

Venues provide benefits including low prices, good food, friendliness, safety, and a pleasant atmosphere; they are accessible and open long hours (S. 6.3)

105

DOJ 2010 (Thomas), Problem Gambling Vulnerability

Venues with EGMs were seen as safe, clean, attractive, secure and new and were preferred venues, especially for women (S.2.2.3).

Increased support for community groups

106

NIEIR 2000, Economic Impact of Gambling

Voluntary donations paid by some gaming venues (p. 222).

107

VCGA 2001, Social and Economic Impacts of Gaming

Voluntary donations to community groups paid by some gaming venues(p.73).

108

PC Report on Gambling 2010

Contribution of clubs and hotels, voluntary donations (S. 6.2 and 6.6).

109

CIE 2009, Gambling with Policy

Revenue returned to community (p.6).

Community Support Fund contributions

110

Gambling Regulation Act 2003

Division 2-Taxes and levies (3.6.12): Payment to Community Support Fund

111

VCGA 2001, Social and Economic Impacts of Gaming

Appendix D: Tax rates for the various legal forms of gambling in Victoria (p.187)

112

PC Report on Gambling 2010

Regulatory processes and institutions (S. 17)

Community Benefit Statement

113

Gambling Regulation Act 2003

Division 2-Taxes and levies (3.6.9): Community benefit statements

114

PC Report of Gambling 2010

Community Benefit Statements (S. 6.7)

Contribution to the local economy

115

NIEIR 2000, Economic Impact of Gambling

Victorian study - Traces the economic impact of the provision of EGMs (Ch.4.8, p.52)

116

VCGA 2001, Social and Economic Impacts of Gaming

Analytical framework of the social and economic impacts of gaming (Ch.5, p. 79)

Employment

117

PC Report on Gambling 2010

Employment in the industry (S. 2, p. 2.13)

118

ABS 2006, Gambling Services

The industry provides employment across Australia (Ch.2, p.6)

119

NIEIR 2000, Economic Impact of Gambling

First round distributive effect: The most obvious distribution back to the region comes in the form of wages and salaries to venue employees (S. 4.8, p.53).

120

VCGA 2001, Social and Economic Impacts of Gaming

Analytical framework and associated indicators that would provide a model for the analysis and evaluation of the social and related economic impacts of gaming.

121

CIE 2009, Gambling with Policy

Employment and spending in the gaming manufacturing sector (at national level) (p.7) Clubs with EGMs employ 36% more people than clubs without EGMs. Hotels with EGMS  employ 78% more staff than hotels without EGMs

Tourism

122

The general evidence for this indicator is weak, therefore, despite being part of the VCGR application form, impacts in this area should not be considered unless supported by specific and compelling evidence.

Priority Populations - Previous - Next - Impacts (Negative)

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